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New Zealand signs chilled meat agreement with China

FBR Staff Writer Published 28 March 2017

New Zealand exporters will soon be allowed to send chilled meat to China under a new agreement signed by the two countries.

Significant revenues are expected to be made by the New Zealand meat sector following a Memorandum of Cooperation signed by New Zealand's Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy and Trade Minister Todd McClay.

According to the New Zealand government, China has been the second biggest market for exports of beef and sheep products.

Last year, New Zealand made revenue of around NZ$1bn ($700m) from the exports of frozen beef and sheep meat with the business increasing five times since 2011.

Guy and McClay have called the agreement a big victory for chilled meat exporters.

Guy said: “With great air links to China, exporters have the opportunity to fill returning planes with chilled meat as demand grows.”

The six month meat export trial, as per the New Zealand government shows that its work programme has progressed well to expand access to Chinese market for a variety of meat products.

Ten meat processors will be initially involved in the export trade of frozen meat products into China.

McClay said: “Trade in chilled meat to China will initially involve ten meat establishments agreed in conjunction with industry. I'm excited that New Zealand’s premium chilled cuts will be enjoyed in high-end restaurants and retailers in China very soon.”

“This agreement has the potential to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars for our farmers, exporters and the wider economy.”

Separately, New Zealand has also secured an agreement to export retail-ready fresh unpeeled onions into China.


Image: China agrees to allow chilled meat exports from New Zealand. Photo: courtesy of KEKO64/Freedigitalphotos.net.